Posts Tagged ‘Witch Hunt’

The Mueller Report: I read it for you, but you should read it for yourself. pt. 7

July 2, 2019

The President’s Further Efforts to Have the Attorney General Take Over the Investigation

From summer 2017 through 2018, Mr. Trump pressured Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reverse his recusal, take control of the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russian subversion of our nation’s elections (and specifically of Russia’s intense campaign to help elect Trump, an effort that included over 200 contacts between Trump’s campaign and Russian operatives), and to order an investigation of Hillary Clinton despite the fact that multiple investigations by the FBI and Republican-controlled Congress had not found any significant wrongdoing. This episode includes more examples of Trump’s own people thinking his orders were so irrational or illegal that they simply refused to carry them out. Jeff Sessions testified that Trump asked in July 2017 to “unrecuse himself” so that he could order an investigation of Ms. Clinto, and to unrecuse from “all of it” including the Russia investigation in which he was himself both witness and potential target. About that same time Mr. Trump asked Staff Secretary Rob Porter about Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand, and specifically whether she was “on the team” and whether she would like to be responsible for the Special Counsel’s investigation and whether she would want to be Attorney General.   Porter considered the idea of reaching out to her in this manner to be inappropriate, and did not do as the President ordered. It seems that the Deep State that Mr. Trump complains is undermining his efforts to be the Best President Ever is made up largely of his own advisors and staff refusing his demands. Don McGahn and Hope Hicks both testified that Mr. Trump regarded Sessions as disloyal for having recused himself from the Russia investigation, since it meant he wouldn’t be able to shield Trump or to prosecute those he wished to target. From October through December Trump repeatedly asked Sessions to “unrecuse” like Ralphie trying to get a Red Ryder BB Gun. He was always careful not to demand it, but to suggest, request, ask him to think about it, and then tweet about how unfair and incompetent it was that no one was investigating Clinton while he was being so sorely persecuted, or suggest in press interviews that his AG was less loyal than others because he didn’t protect him. Finally, after a year and a half of public statements and private pressure on Sessions to block investigation of Russian contacts with his campaign, and to investigate his rival instead, Mr. Trump finally fired Jeff Sessions.

Mr. Mueller considered the following elements to be relevant to the question of obstruction of justice:

  1. Obstructive Act: Would having Sessions reverse his recusal and take charge of the investigation naturally impede its activity? Mueller did not ask what Sessions would or would not do if he had unrecused himself; there is no way to know. Instead, he asked whether the President*’s actions to get him to do so would themselves have had the natural effect of impeding the Russia investigation. In this regard, the report states, “On multiple occasions in 2017, the President spoke with Sessions about reversing his recusal so that he could take over the Russia investigation and begin an investigation and prosecution of Hillary Clinton… The duration of the President’s efforts—which spanned from March 2017 to August 2018—and the fact that the President repeatedly criticized Sessions in public and in private for failing to tell the President that he would have to recuse is relevant to assessing whether the President’s efforts to have Sessions unrecuse could qualify as obstructive acts.” This does not directly state that yes, there was an obstructive act. However, had Sessions taken over the investigation, it would have been with the understanding that he would not look at what Trump did not want examined, and that he was to look at whatever Trump did want investigated. In other words, had Sessions followed the President’s request to take over, he would have been doing so with full knowledge that his taking over was to allow the President to control the investigation for his own ends.
  2. Nexus to an official proceeding: While all these efforts to meddle were going on, there were two grand jury investigations which could have been affected. Again, the report does not directly say that they would have been affected, but only that the public and private statements of Mr. Trump were that he wanted Sessions to take over so he could affect these investigations.
  3. Intent: The report states, “There is evidence that at least one purpose of the President’s conduct toward Sessions was to have Sessions assume control over the Russia investigation and supervise it in a way that would restrict its scope.” He knew by then that he was already under investigation for possible obstruction of justice in his efforts to protect Michael Flynn, and that his son Donald Jr., his son-in-law Jared Kushner and his former campaign manager Paul Manafort were also under investigation. Mr. Trump continually complained to Sessions and others that he was not being treated “fairly” and that he wanted his opponent investigated and prosecuted for something. The report concludes that it is “a reasonable inference…that the President believed that an unrecused Attorney General would play a protective role and could shield the President from the ongoing Russia investigation.”

Mr. Trump has stated repeatedly that be thinks the job of the Attorney General is to be the personal attorney for Donald J. Trump at taxpayer’s expense, not to do the business of the people and government of the United States of America in an impartial and nonpartisan manner. Up until the time that Mr. Sessions was fired and replaced by William Barr, Trump’s efforts to use the Attorney General for personal and partisan business was thwarted by those around him who did not want to be involved in potential obstruction of justice, or who simply thought the President was behaving in an irrational and self-destructive manner and thus sought to save him from himself by promising to carry out his fool notions with no intention of actually doing so.

The Mueller Report: I read it for you, but you should read it yourself. pt. 3(c)

June 23, 2019

How does all of this relate to the three constitutive elements of an obstruction of justice?

  1. Obstructive Act: It is true that Mr. Trump was aware that James Comey was not only investigating Trump’s friend Michael Flynn but was also looking into other aspects of Russian efforts to help elect Trump, including whether any other American citizens had committed crimes. On the other hand, he was advised repeatedly that firing Comey would not end the investigations; as Steve Bannon told him, “You can’t fire the FBI.” Trump even acknowledged as much during his interview with Lester Holt, saying it was likely firing Comey would actually prolong the investigation. What seems to have most troubled Mueller and seems most likely to be part of an illegal obstruction of justice is the way Trump handled it. The vengefulness, the petty cruelty, and the public attacks on the investigation and cries of “Witch hunt!” afterwards seem, according to the report, intended to affect and obstruct whatever future investigators might take over after Comey’s departure. True, there might be other, legally innocent motives, such as paranoia, sadism, or stupidity. That question falls under “intent.” What we can say is that there were in fact official investigations that could be disrupted by this behavior, that Mr. Trump was aware of these investigations and continued in this behavior anyway, despite the fact that his office requires him to support upholding the laws of the nation without undue personal prejudice.
  2. Nexus to a proceeding: You can’t obstruct justice unless there’s an official proceeding to obstruct. In this case, while there was no official grand jury at that time investigating the Trump campaign, there was a criminal investigation of Flynn that Trump had tried to shut down, and public knowledge that the FBI was looking into Russian interference in the 2016 election, including the crime of hacking the DNC’s computers. Thus there was a nexus to at least one official proceeding.
  3. Intent: As the report states: “Substantial evidence indicates that the catalyst for the President’s decision to fire Comey was Comey’s unwillingness to publicly state that the President was not personally under investigation, despite the President’s repeated requests that Comey make such an announcement….the President’s over stated rationales for why he fired Comey are not similarly supported by the evidence.” In other words, the report says that Comey was fired for not publicly clearing Trump, and that Trump and others working on his behalf lied about the true reasons for the firing. As stated earlier, intention to deceive is tacit acknowledgment of wrongdoing; if it doesn’t prove impure motives, it at least implies such. But why, the report asks, what this so important? Was it merely for political reasons, because “this Russia business” was making it difficult for Trump to carry out his agenda for the nation? Was it because, as has been stated outside the Mueller but in multiple press reports and books, that Mr. Trump gets angry when anyone mentions that Russia helped elect him because it takes away from his own sense of accomplishment? Or are there other, criminal reasons for Trump’s repeated demands for Comey to publicly announce his innocence? There are the demands that Comey pledge his “loyalty” to Trump personally, and his claim that he thought the Attorney General was not doing enough to protect him personally. He also said he wanted to be able to tell his Attorney General “who to investigate.” Comey was interfering with these goals by the fact that he’d taken over the investigations after Sessions recused himself, and by the independent way he was handling the investigations. Also, when Trump was railing against Sessions for recusing himself and for not doing more to protect Trump and punish Trump’s foes, Sessions had suggested firing Comey, either because he was suggesting to Mr. Trump that this would solve his problems or perhaps merely to redirect Trump’s anger onto someone else. In addition, as the Muller report states, “…the evidence does indicate that a thorough FBI investigation would uncover facts about the campaign and the President personally that the President could have understood to be crimes or that would give rise to personal and political concerns.” Thus there is a strong prima facie case that Trump was motivated by personal goals rather than national interests in firing Comey, the definition of “corrupt intent.”

As Mr. Mueller stated, we need to have some sort of a hearing to allow the accused party the chance to clear his name. Legally, there is no law against being stupid, sadistic, deceitful, vain, vindictive, paranoid or obstinate. These may be reasons to say someone is unfit for an important office, but they are not crimes. Perhaps Mr. Trump was not trying to shut down or intimidate other investigations, and anyone or everyone around him who might think about challenging his orders. Perhaps he was just running the White House the way he’d run his businesses: as his wife says, if he feels you’ve hit him he’ll hit back ten times harder.[1] Perhaps, as many who have or do work for him are reported to have said, he’s very insecure about his election victory, and his desire to have Comey and others come out and publicly say he had nothing to do with Russia is his way of insisting that he won on his own, without Putin’s help, despite what Putin said at Helsinki and what every U.S. intelligence agency has said. But as Mueller said, the only way to bring these facts out, and show whether or not Trump had corrupt motives or simply acted foolishly in ways that appear corrupt, is to have an impeachment investigation, where all the facts can be presented and the President can take the opportunity to personally defend himself under oath. As it stands, the report states, there is evidence that the President* knowingly and intentionally obstructed justice, seeking to impede and influence official investigations of crimes as well as undermining counterintelligence operations, for corrupt personal reasons.

[1] Ali Vitali, “Melania Stumps for Donald Trump: ‘He Will Punch Back 10 Times Harder;” NBC News.com April 4, 2016 (https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/2016-election/melania-stumps-donald-trump-he-will-punch-back-10-times-n550641). Or as Mr. Trump says on Twitter: “When someone attacks me, I always attack back…except 100x more. This has nothing to do with a tirade but rather, a way of life!” @realDonaldTrump Twitter 11 Nov. 2012. These claims, I believe, fit the dictionary definitions of “vindictive” and “vengeful.”