Posts Tagged ‘christian zionist’

How the Republican Party Became a Death Cult, pt. 3

August 28, 2021

            The so-called “Moral Majority” and “Religious Right” jumped into politics just as apocalypticism was on the rise, and they used it as a motivational force to fire up their voters.  It also came to drive much of their thinking on political policy, and these notions in turn began to take over Republican thinking in general.  The Antichrist was predicted to be a “world leader,” so Evangelical “prophets” devised an elaborate fantasy whereby the United Nations and its Secretary General would take over the entire world, which would be pretty amazing given the general fecklessness of the organization to date.  (This had the added advantage that it saved them from asking uncomfortable questions about who really is said to be “the most powerful man on Earth,” the Caesar of the 20th Century’s greatest empire, and thus the most logical applicant for the role of “all-powerful world leader” which they were advertising—POTUS.)  Israel plays a major part in the Apocalypse despite the fact that it wasn’t even an independent nation when either Daniel or John wrote, so the Religious Right became Zionists; but the final Battle of Armageddon takes place in Israel, so the Religious Right had to oppose any possibility of peace that might have ensured Israel’s existence.[1]  Instead, since their vision required a nuclear conflagration before Jesus returns, the Religious Right has consistently pushed for more militarism, more war, more international tension, and either pooh-poohed the dangers of World War III (since the Good People will be raptured away to Heaven) or actively sought to encourage it.  No war, no Jesus, so they have to have their war.  The Religious Right thus pushed the Republican Party to become, quite simply, pro-death, pro-war, pro-Armageddon. 

            The same logic drives GOP contempt for diplomacy also drives much of its contempt for climate science.  The Revelation of John depicts a world in famine, with both land and sea in near-total environmental collapse.  Since this disaster for humanity (not to mention nonhumans, since these superlative Christians never mention them) is actually a blessing for the “true believers” who expect to be raptured away into Heaven before things get really bad and then to return with Jesus to rule over the miraculously restored new Earth, they actually welcome all the dire warnings of environmentalists.  They want the Earth to burn with wildfires and drought. They want crops to fail and fish to die.  All of this is simply the fulfillment of their vision of the End Times.

            I cannot emphasize enough how mistaken and self-serving all of this is.  The original apocalyptic writings have two things in common.  First and most obviously, they are all extremely symbolic.  Many of these symbols are traditional, practically a code which is understood by the community but unintelligible to outsiders.  When the original readers of Daniel read a description of a series of kingdoms ending in a divided kingdom (Daniel 2:31-45) they knew to whom it referred:  the kingdoms of the Persians and the Greeks, to Alexander’s empire which was divided at his death, and which they believed would be replaced by the reign of God.  When John’s readers read a description of a beast with seven heads, they knew it meant Rome and the Caesars (Revelation 13:1-10).  They did not expect a literal beast, and for the most part they were not too surprised when the world didn’t end and they had to reinterpret the prophesies.  We can see this in the Gospels, where the more apocalyptic Mark (the first written) was succeeded by others that depicted the Kingdom of God as an ongoing, growing reality, the Church.  The oldest versions of Mark end at the empty tomb; Luke by contrast wrote a sequel, the Acts of the Apostles, where the Kingdom of God is seen being fulfilled not in the end of the world but in the ministry of Paul in Rome.  The end of the world prophecies that most Christians believed were fulfilled as the world they had known did, in fact, end, replaced by a new and unimaginable reality:  the Roman gods thrown down, and worship of the God of Israel spread around the world.  But the end and the new beginning were different than they’d expected, and for the most part they rolled with it.  Today’s Fundamentalists,  with their selective biblical literalism, demand a literal end of the world, while claiming the authority and mission to change how these ancient symbolic writings were understood to fit the political agenda they desire—their dislikes become demons, their ideological targets become the Antichrist, and so on. 

            The second, and essential reality of apocalyptic writings are that they were addressed to the poor and persecuted.  Both the writings of Paul and contemporary nonchristian sources indicate that most (not all) early Christians were from the lower classes—not too surprising given the demographics of the Roman Empire, but apparently noteworthy enough at the time.  The writings of Daniel were addressed to the victims of persecution by Antiochus; the writings of John were addressed to Christian churches in Asia Minor, which were under pressure from social, political and economic powers around them.  They were messages to inspire hope in those who had no earthly reason to hope.  By contrast, today’s White Evangelical community is culturally and politically dominant, a powerful force worldwide and particularly in the United States, the most powerful nation on Earth.  While the original apocalyptic writings were meant to comfort the afflicted and condemn the comfortable, the new apocalyptic writings of Hal Lindsey and Tim LeHaye, Jerry Jenkins and company are meant to comfort the comfortable, and thus often end up afflicting the afflicted.  They are aimed at showing White, middle-class Fundamentalists that they really do know more about science, economics, politics and everything else, and that those people who didn’t believe them will burn in Hell.  They aim to show that weak and poor nations deserve to be weak and poor, while the United States is rich and strong because God has blessed it for being the home to Christian Fundamentalism.  They aim to reinforce the economic status quo; there’s a direct line between the Christian Dominionism of R. J. Rushdoony, the Christian nationalism of Jerry Falwell, and the Prosperity Gospel that tells the poor that if they show their faith by sending money to the TV preacher God will make them rich.  John of Patmos wrote from exile and imprisonment, but today’s apocalyptic writers are well-funded by the rich who want to wrap themselves in this new gospel that protects their wealth from condemnation.[2]


[1] Mary Jane MacKay (correspondent) and Michael H. Gavshon (producer), “Zion’s Christian Soldiers,” 60 Minutes aired October 6, 2002 (https://www.cbsnews.com/video/zions-christian-soldiers/ transcript https://www.cbsnews.com/news/zions-christian-soldiers/ )

[2] This alliance goes back to the early intellectual fountainhead of the Religious Right, R. J. Rushdoony, who was bankrolled by businessmen opposed to FDR’s New Deal. See Michael J. McVicar, “The Libertarian Theocrats:  the long, strange history of R. J. Rushdoony and Christian Reconstructionism;” September 1, 2007 (https://www.politicalresearch.org/2007/09/01/libertarian-theocrats)

Philosophy and Politics in the Age of Anxiety: postscript (pt. 2)

September 17, 2012

Philosophy and Politics in the Age of Anxiety:  postscript

Continued from pt. 1

            For that matter, and I have not said enough about this, it is clear that much of the Obama mania of 2008 was also an anxiety reaction.  In the chaos brought on by Republican economic dogmatism, many people were looking for a messiah, a miracle man who would change everything by his mere presence and our faith in him.  I listened to Obama’s speeches, and I heard a call to action; but I for one never thought it would be easy.  Clearly, judging from the profound disappointment of many, there were a lot of people who were literally expecting miracles.  I think giving him the Nobel Peace Prize may have been a bit of magical thinking, although even more it represented the profound relief of the rest of the world that the U.S.A. would not be led by a party publicly committed to imposing its own will rather than working cooperatively.  Heck, if I lived in another country, and I understood that the Republican Party is dominated by Christian apocalyptic teachings that the United Nations was or soon would become the Antichrist and try to take over the U.S. I’d be more than relieved to see any Democrat take over.  White anxiety, fear marketing and a patently flawed interpretation of the Gospel into the “Left Behind” Christian Zionist/Prosperity Gospel/Doomsday cult amalgam that is Corporate Evangelicalism may be a toxic brew for American politics; but for American foreign policy, it is Angel Dust, a euphoric to be sure but also a potentially psychosis-inducing, rage inducing poison.  Would YOU want to live next door to a heavily-armed, extremely wealthy PCP abuser, who was convinced of his own invulnerability and immortality as well as of your essential evil?  That is how the U.S.A. appeared to much of the world from the time of the Iraq invasion until 2008.  They saw Obama, by contrast, as the healing angel (or fairy or whatever) who would immediately cure America’s blood-madness and end all conflicts.  Instead, he turned out to be merely a pragmatic, rational human, quite willing to kill his nation’s enemies, and lacking the omnipotence to end injustice and conflict everywhere.

So the disappointment some foreigners and many Americans feel about Obama is testimony to the irrational expectations they had.  These expectations are furthermore testimony to the anxiety that drove them.  Pragmatism would say that it took nearly a decade to inflate the housing bubble, and that it will likely take about that long to fix the problems its bursting exposed.  Anxiety, by contrast, says only that before it was at peace, now it is in turmoil, and something needs to happen right away make everything feel right again.  Anxiety says, just do something, anything!

If this is right (and I wouldn’t be a very good Kierkegaardian if I didn’t admit that nothing is certain, including my pronouncements), then November will bring one of two outcomes.  If Obama wins, it most likely won’t be with the desperate, magical hopes that carried him to victory, but rather with the pragmatic (if not grim) realization that there’s a lot of work to do.  After all, “Change” is something magical; “Forward” is something you say to an army moving towards a decisive challenge.  In the meantime, the fear merchants and anxiety demagogues are already predicting armed civil war when Obama opens up the death camps he’s been secretly building (this from elected Republican officials and candidates, as well as prominent spokespersons and leaders of the conservative movement today).  They will either retreat back into their echo chambers to shout doom to one another some more, or strike out preemptively against the evil Feds.  Anyone remember Oklahoma City?

On the other hand, if Romney wins, it will be largely because of the same anxiety-fueled faith that originally propelled Obama to victory.  The people who wanted America to return to the stable, powerful status quo they remember from childhood will feel victorious.  But America can’t go back.  Those “illegals” are actually, in many cases, legal American citizens.  Minority births outpaced white births, according to the most recent census estimates.[1]  That means that America will continue to change.  Mosques will continue to open where they weren’t before, and to expand where they are already.  Spanish will be spoken aloud on streets and in workplaces.  Technology will lead to new social patterns.  The heroes of your youth will die.  And people will question your settled values and certainties, just by existing as your neighbors and holding different views.  Anxiety is not going away.  And pragmatically, rationally speaking, there is significant empirical evidence that the Obama stimulus plan worked, and that at least some jobs were saved or created, which most of the jobs that were lost disappeared before he took office or before the stimulus bill was passed.  Also, there is significant reason to believe that returning to the economic philosophies that caused the economic meltdown are unlikely to solve it.  Kevin Phillips has been saying for a decade that wealth gaps like we have are unsustainable; and he started saying that when the wealth gap was much smaller.[2]  That is the same Kevin Phillips who was the chief economist for President Richard Nixon, and the one who predicted the Republican Revolution that propelled Reagan into power.  This is no commie-come-lately; this is a bona fide conservative economist, once one of the esteemed inner circle, now cast out of favor because he began predicting that just as Democrats lost power for breaking faith with the middle class, so too would Republicans soon lose power for the same reason.  Romney’s professed intentions (and God alone knows what he’ll actually do) are to exacerbate the wealth gap, accelerate the concentration of wealth in the hands of a few plutocrats, and shift more of the tax burden to the poor and middle classes.  In fact, a Republican shibboleth these days is that we need to “broaden the tax base,” (which means we need to make poor people pay more in taxes) “so we can reduce the burden on the job creators” (which means cutting taxes for the wealthy).  Economists estimate that we would have to seize 100% of everything the poor have to offset the tax cuts that have been planned for the 1%.  That is not going to happen.  Since that is not going to happen, the fact is that the numbers don’t add up, and Romney will not be able to deliver on the expectations his base have for him.

What Republican political strategists are saying is that, given the demographic shifts already occurring, the Republican Party will have to change.  And “change” is anathema.  When Sara Palin mockingly asked, “How’s that hopey-changey thing workin’ for y’ah?” a huge crowd cheered.  Their hope was that there would not be any change.  If only nothing had changed, then everything would be great today!  But change was always inevitable.  If Romney changes, the base will be livid.  If he doesn’t, then the world will change and the base will be livid.

Ergo, as long as our politics is based on anxiety, we should expect wild political swings, political polarization, and rampant paranoia, on all sides.


[1] Hope Yen, “For First Time, Minorities Surpass Whites in US Births;” Associated Press 5/17/2012 (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47458196/ns/us_news-life/t/census-minorities-now-surpass-whites-us-births/#.UDeuRnC5hds)

[2] “Wealth and Democracy,” PBS Newshour, July 17, 2002, (https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/wealth-and-democracy)